Calling all plant ladies (and gents)... This gorgeous monstera punch needle pattern is FREE and easy enough for punching beginners!
This post and photos may contain Amazon or other affiliate links. If you purchase something through any link I may receive a small commission at no extra charge to you.
You are here: Crafts / Yarn and Needle Crafts / Punch Needle / Monstera Punch Needle Pattern

This time several years ago I was living at the southern most tip of Texas. It was a big adjustment moving from the center of Oklahoma to the U.S./Mexican border but as I did adjust I found so many things I loved about the area. First and foremost, the food. Seriously. There are a bazillion restaurants and the area is on just about every list of obese cities in the nation. And it’s all because that food is amazing.

Also it was super close to South Padre Island which has some amazing beaches. Plus there was Boca Chica Beach where sometimes you’d be the only person on the sand as far as your eyes could see. It was like having a private beach!

And last, but not least, was the perfect climate for growing tropical plants outdoors. Most of the plants the rest of the country can have only indoors can be planted outside and thrive year-long.

Calling all plant ladies (and gents)... This gorgeous monstera punch needle pattern is FREE and easy enough for punching beginners!

This is when I fell in love with Monstera.

Those hole-y leafs, with their shiny, dark green are gorgeous. And they can grow to be lush and thick plants with gigantic leaves! Now that I’m back where it actually gets cold (at least for a wuss like me :) I can’t have monstera outside any more. And since it’s extremely toxic and I have 2 cats that try to eat anything green I can’t have it indoors, either. So I decided to bring the pretty monstera leaf to life in my home in a pretty monstera punch needle pillow!

Free Printable Punch Needle Patterns Are Available to Our Newsletter Subscribers

Newsletter subscribers get this and other files at Dream a Little Bigger for free. (Yay!) Not a member? Signing up is easy and costs nothing. Enter your information in the form below below to join our growing community of makers. You’ll get this freebie emailed to you. As a member you’ll also get post updates, tips and tricks, craft & DIY inspiration, and more sent right to your email a few times a week. Questions or download issues?

Monstera Punch Needle Pillow Pattern

Sign up for our newsletter and you’ll get an email to download your free file.

Thank you for subscribing!

Easy Enough for Beginners!

I made this pattern specifically for myself. I’m definitely what you’d consider a beginner at punch needle. And while I’ve purchased a handful of gorgeous patterns by super talented punch needle designers, I’ve shied away from making them. My goal for this particular pattern was that I wanted it to be easy enough that I would feel confident enough to make it. Because nobody likes wasting time or supplies on a project that doesn’t pan out.

Calling all plant ladies (and gents)... This gorgeous monstera punch needle pattern is FREE and easy enough for punching beginners!

Putting together the large monstera pattern.

Print your free pattern. Using clear tape, piece together the last 6 pages of the PDF together to form one large pattern. 

Print your free pattern. Tape together the last 6 pages of the PDF together to form one large pattern.

Supplies Needed to Embroider This Monstera Punch Needle Design

Punch needle supplies can be very expensive. Since I am still fairly new to the craft myself, I’ve opted to find inexpensive alternatives to the supplies needed, like a frame to punch this design on.

Making an inexpensive frame.

Grab a 20" x 20" fine art canvas that is stretched over a frame from the craft store.

Grab a 20″ x 20″ fine art canvas that is stretched over a frame from the craft store. Remove the canvas and you’ve got the perfect frame for this project!

Wrap Monk's cloth over the frame and use a staple gun to secure it.

Wrap Monk’s cloth over the frame and use a staple gun to secure it. Now you’re ready to get your pattern going!

Transfer the pattern to your fabric.

While this is my first big punch needle design, I’ve already made 2 others, as well. That’s given me quite a bit of experience back to back to back of what works and what doesn’t. If you transfer the pattern onto your monk’s cloth before you put it on the frame, you stretch out the design and lose a good few inches of it all around. I have found 2 ways that work well to transfer the pattern to the fabric that is already stapled to its frame.

Creating an Iron-On

The first option is to turn your pattern over and trace all along the back using an iron-on transfer pen.I like to use the Sulky Iron-On Transfer Pen in either Red or Black. When it’s time to replace I just buy whichever of the two colors is cheaper. Place something inside of your frame that is thick enough to make the fabric fairly even with the height of the frame. Place the pattern on the fabric and loosely pin in place, iron-on side down (printed side up). Use the heat from a household iron to transfer the design according to your pen’s directions.

If, like me you don’t have an iron (what? I’m self-employed and believe in knit fabrics :) if you have a Cricut EasyPress, bust that baby out and it’s big heat plate means you’ll knock this pattern out in literally a few minutes.

Transferring with Light

Place the pattern inside of the frame with the printed design facing the back of your fabric. Push the paper edges slightly beneath the wood of the frame so that it stays put or pin in place. Take the frame and place it in front of a light source like a bright window or an LED light box for tracing. Trace the design onto the fabric using a fabric marker or a plain old sharpie.

Punch it!!!

Once your have completed punching your project, use a flat screwdriver or a pair of needle-nose pliers to carefully remove the staples.

Once your have completed punching your project, use a flat screwdriver or a pair of needle-nose pliers to carefully remove the staples.

Your monstera punch needle piece is done and can be used as a framed art piece or sewn into a pillow!

Your monstera punch needle piece is done and can be used as a framed art piece or sewn into a pillow!

And if you’re interested in sewing a pillow but don’t know how, please check back. Soon I’ll be sharing a tutorial to make a simple sewn envelope pillow back that works perfectly for these big punch needle designs!

Monstera Punch Needle Design

Calling all plant ladies (and gents)… This gorgeous monstera punch needle pattern is FREE and easy enough for punching beginners!
Print Recipe Pin Recipe
Calling all plant ladies (and gents)... This gorgeous monstera punch needle pattern is FREE and easy enough for punching beginners!
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 3 hours
Total Time: 3 hours 15 minutes

Ingredients

Instructions

  • Print the PDF free pattern and piece together last 6 pages to form one approximately 18" x 18" punch needle pattern.
    Print your free pattern. Using clear tape, piece together the last 6 pages of the PDF together to form one large pattern. 
  • Secure Monk's Cloth to a 20" x 20" frame made from canvas stretcher bars or reclaimed from a stretched artist's canvas.
    Wrap Monk's cloth over the frame and use a staple gun to secure it.
  • Transfer design from the pattern to the monk's cloth using a backlit tracing box or a window.
  • Punch the design.
    Your monstera punch needle piece is done and can be used as a framed art piece or sewn into a pillow!
Calling all plant ladies (and gents)... This gorgeous monstera punch needle pattern is FREE and easy enough for punching beginners!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

One Comment

  1. Your monstera patterned pillow is so cute!!! I just want to hug it (I’m a weirdo pillow hugger)!!
    It would be so cool to have a monstera plant, but I don’t think that it would survive a single winter season up here in the buckeye state. Their native to tropical forests in Mexico, which is waaay warmer than here. :(

    Where you used to live sounds amazing. I’m a total “foodie” and would probably eat myself into oblivion if I were there. :)