Crisscross Crochet Super Scarf Pattern for Beginners

November 15, 2019Allison Murray
Want one of those pretty & giant super scarves? This Crisscross Crochet Super Scarf Pattern is gorgeously oversized and easy enough for beginners!

This is a sponsored post written by me on behalf of We Crochet. The opinions and text are all mine. Want one of those pretty & giant super scarves? This Crisscross Crochet Super Scarf Pattern is gorgeously oversized and easy enough for beginners!

Want one of those pretty & giant super scarves? This Crisscross Crochet Super Scarf Pattern is gorgeously oversized and easy enough for beginners!

Hello! While I’ve been deep in the throes of Christmas crafting (did you SEE my Unicorn Christmas Tree, y’all?) I’ve finally gotten into winter crafts. Like winter crafts to keep my cold self warm!

And I’m so happy today because I’ve made my very first super scarf! It’s been one of those projects that I’ve wanted at the end of my hook for quite some time but I just didn’t know when I’d find the time to make something so, well, super!

But no worries! I’ve worked out a pattern using a super bulky yarn that you can get done in a day. And if you’re a particularly fast hooker, it will only take 4-5 hours! Let’s dive right in!

What makes a scarf a super scarf?

With a width between 10 inches to 24 inches and a length of at least 100 inches, you’ve probably guessed that the “super” is in relation to the size. Now I’m a measurement dummy. While I do know that 100 is a big number and 100 inches pretty darn long, it just doesn’t automatically click what that means in real life. So here are a few examples I put together if you need some help grasping just how SUPER a super-sized scarf really is (like I did).

Want one of those pretty & giant super scarves? This Crisscross Crochet Super Scarf Pattern is gorgeously oversized and easy enough for beginners!

For reference, 100 inches is:

  • 2.77778 yards
  • 8.3333 feet
  • taller than Shaquille O’Neal (he’s 87 inches).
  • much taller than Danny DeVito (he’s 59 inches).
  • a quarter of the height of most telephone phones.
  • probably getting close to your ceiling in height as a single story averages 10 feet.

Boom! Isn’t that just super?

How big of a scarf do you get from this super scarf pattern?

This crochet super scarf pattern yields a big-ass scarf that measures 108″ long (not including the fringe) and 11″ wide. After a few trial runs I found that I am happiest with this crazy long length to have a scarf that is between 10 and 11 inches wide. Any wider and the thing becomes really difficult for me to wrap neatly around myself.

Want one of those pretty & giant super scarves? This Crisscross Crochet Super Scarf Pattern is gorgeously oversized and easy enough for beginners!

At first, the size of your scarf might make it a bit daunting to wear. But with a few practice go-rounds, I found myself easily able to pop my scarf on. What I get is a look that I’m just loving… super full around my neck which is also super comfy and warm. And then there’s this lovely and super high-impact drape with one end hanging at my back and the other down my front.

Is this crochet super scarf pattern really for beginners?

Yes! The only stitches you need to know basic crochet stitches to hook up your own massively gorgeous super scarf. And we’ll cover the stitches you need in just a minute.

Since we’re using a nice and bulky yarn even if you are new to crochet this scarf works up really quickly. By estimation, it took about 5 hours to hook up but that includes sitting in the doctor’s office, riding in the car while running errands and watching TV. I’ve crocheted A LOT so if you truly are a beginner it will take some more time. But that being said, I’m still confident it will hook up much more quickly than you probably anticipate.

Let’s cover those stitches I promised to talk about, okay?

Want one of those pretty & giant super scarves? This Crisscross Crochet Super Scarf Pattern is gorgeously oversized and easy enough for beginners!

Stitches used:

  1. Chain
  2. Single Crochet
  3. Double Crochet
  4. Crossed Double Crochet

What is the Crossed Double Crochet Stitch?

When I was a kid my grandmother taught me how to crochet. I was getting so bored of just double crocheting for ages and I wanted her to teach me how to do something else so things weren’t so much the same. In came the crossed double crochet, a way that just barely tweaked the stitch I knew by heart but gave me a completely different looking result.

If you know how to double crochet I promise that you, too, can totally accomplish a crossed double crochet. You’re basically crisscrossing 2 double crochet stitches into an X shape.

The first stitch in a crossed double crochet pair is created in the second stitch from the hook (skipping the stitch immediately next to the hook).

The first stitch in a crossed double crochet pair is created in the second stitch from the hook (skipping the stitch immediately next to the hook).

The second stitch in the crossed double crochet pair is made in the stitch you skipped. Crossing behind the stitch you just created and make your second stitch.

The second stitch in the crossed double crochet pair is made in the stitch you just skipped. Crossing behind your first stitch, go back to the skipped stitch and make another double crochet. Once complete this pair or Crossed Double Crochet Stitch is complete.

Bing, bang, boom. Crossed Double Crochet stitch DONE. This stitch is used heavily in this design simply because my first go was way too heavy to be worn. A crossed double crochet can give you a nice amount of texture without using a ton of yarn. That helps to give our Crisscross Crochet Super Scarf some interesting texture without adding to the weight. Because at 11″ wide and 108″ long, this sucker is already packing some weight.

This entire pattern is crocheted in the back loops only.

If you are a newbie crocheter here’s a quick lesson on loops…

When crocheting you're sometimes asked to hook in both loops or only the front or back loop.

When crocheting you’re sometimes asked to hook in both loops or only the front or back loop. The first image is the front loop. The second is the back loop, the one we’re crocheting in for this pattern. And the last image the hook is through both loops.

Supplies required to crochet your first super scarf:

I recently found and fell in love with a pin with the most gorgeous rainbow crochet afghan kit. And then I got contacted by We Crochet asking if I needed yarn for any projects and I was all heck yes, I do. Because I had huge plans to make a super scarf that I just hadn’t gotten around to… yet.

My sponsor for this post, We Crochet has a stunning array of colors, weights and fiber contents.

I took a look at their website looking at the different options they offer and I was super pleased. We Crochet has a stunning array of colors, weights and fiber contents. And flat out, their color game is STRONG over there.

While selecting my yarn for this project I decided that I didn’t want this super scarf to take a super long time. And that meant going bulkier in yarn. I loved the look of theTuff Puff. The colors were fabulous and I liked the puffy fluffy texture of the yarn. For this scarf, I used their bright pink “Cactus Flower”. And, as I said before, I worked on this project at the doctor’s office this week. Standing in the elevator with my fabric tote full of yarn (for real, I went to the doctor with a big freaking tub of yarn in tow) a lady told me it was a “gorgeous color”. And it is. Cactus flower is just too pretty for words and I fear my photos don’t do it justice. It’s SO PRETTY.

Ooh, but back to the yarn…  It’s 100% wool and not washable. It is, however, feltable. It’s a true super bulky meaning you’ll need a big hook to work it. We’re going to rock a gigantic Q hook for this super scarf pattern. While playing around with the yarn I found that an N hook worked beautifully if you want a tighter fabric.

A few tips before we get started…

This pattern is worked length-wise so that you have fewer edges to worry about. I know when I was first starting to crochet my sides always looked a little bit wonky no matter what I seemed to do. Since your sides are the ends of the scarf they’ll only be 10-11 inches wide meaning less chance of them getting funky because there just isn’t much to them. Isn’t that fab? Plus we’re adding fringe which will further disguise any wonkiness. And fringe on a scarf is always lovely!

This scarf measures 108″ long (not including the fringe). I’m 5 foot 8 and it’s a good length on me to wrap around twice and then hang quite a bit. You might want to make your scarf smaller if you’re more petite than me or longer if you’re much taller. When resizing this pattern you just need to start with a chain with an even number. This pattern calls for 142 but if you might want to only chain 120 if you’re a little shorty like my mom :) Just as long as it’s an even number of chain stitches to start, you’re golden.

Want one of those pretty & giant super scarves? This Crisscross Crochet Super Scarf Pattern is gorgeously oversized and easy enough for beginners!

Crisscross Crochet Super Scarf Pattern for Beginners

Chain 144.

← Row 1: In the third chain from your hook, single crochet to the end. (142 stitches)
→ Row 2: Chain 3 (acts as first double crochet stitch) and turn your work. * Skip the nearest stitch to your hook and double crochet in the second stitch from your hook. Go back and double crochet in the skipped stitch (first crossed double crochet made). Repeat from * to create 139 more Crossed Double Crochet stitches. Double crochet once in the last stitch of the row.
← Row 3:  Chain 1 and turn your work (does NOT act as your first stitch). Single crochet in the very first stitch and every stitch to the end. (142 stitches).
Rows 4-13: Repeat rows 2 & 3.

* Pattern Notes *

This pattern is crocheted in back loops ONLY.
If you prefer foundation crochet, skip both the chain and the first row and instead foundation single crochet 142 stitches.
Shorten this pattern by reducing the number of stitches. As long as you start with an even number of single crochet stitches in your first row, this pattern will work with whatever length you want to achieve.

Adding Fringe to Your Super Scarf (optional but awesome)

Fringe is optional but always fabulous. If I have to choose between a fringed scarf and a scarf without, I’m going for the fringe-y sucker every time. There is also the added bonus to adding fringe in that if your edges are a bit wonky fringe hides that. If you’re a beginner that could make a huge difference in your finished product.

Adding fringe is super simple…

Trim a few pieces of yarn to the same length. Mine are 22".

Trim a few pieces of yarn to the same length. Mine are 22″ which I think works with a 108″ long scarf. Make sure the ends meet up and find the middle of the yarn as you see above.

Pull the center you found in your yarn pieces through the edge of your scarf.

Pull the center you found in your yarn pieces through the edge of your scarf around the first stitch in a single crochet row. FYI we’re NOT adding fringe to the crossed double crochet rows, only the single crochet rows.

Reach in through the loop and grab the ends of the yarn. Pull through.

Reach in through the loop and grab the ends of the yarn. Pull through.

Pull the ends you grabbed through the loop and tighten.

Pull the ends you grabbed through the loop and tighten. Fringe #1 complete! Repeat until you’ve got fringe at the end of every single crochet row.

Once you’re fringed you’re done!

How to wear your DIY crochet super scarf.

Want one of those pretty & giant super scarves? This Crisscross Crochet Super Scarf Pattern is gorgeously oversized and easy enough for beginners!

Wearing your scarf is easy but putting the darn thing on is a bit of a whole thing. My suggestion is to look at images online. Just Google Super Scarf and check out how others wrap theirs around for some ideas on how to wear it. And when you’re putting it on for the first time or two, and this sounds silly, but you might want to stand on a chair. Just because a super scarf is so darn long that it will drag on the ground if you’re paying more attention to how you’re wrapping it around your neck than how the ends are doing.

At first, I thought it was always going to be a bear and a half putting this scarf on but you get used to it pretty quickly. I’m at the point now that I can put it on without looking in a mirror or standing on a chair and it looks great now that I know how to throw it on.

I love, love, love this super scarf way more than I ever imagined I would. It’s amazing. The wool is so nice and toasty but not scratchy. And even though I used a lot of yarn, the weight of this scarf really is not heavy. All of that is totally down to the fact that I used Tuff Puff from We Crochet. I’m so pleased with the selection and quality at We Crochet that I’m already planning my next crochet project using their gorgeous yarns. Seriously. Go and treat yourself and then use our super scarf pattern to hook up this beautiful accessory!


Want one of those pretty & giant super scarves? This Crisscross Crochet Super Scarf Pattern is gorgeously oversized and easy enough for beginners!

Comments (1)

  • Mike

    November 17, 2019 at 10:06 PM

    This is so cool, Allison! I REALLY need a scarf like this, especially with the kind of winters that we get here in Ohio. ;)
    Beautifully done, as always!! ^_^

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